Review: Cotswolds Cook Book

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Cotswold, food and drink, lifestyle, Laura Brown, Kettle Mag
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It’s safe to say we all love good food. In a world where there are so many restaurants appearing across all cities and towns, what could be handier than a guide to the best places to check out? The Cotswolds Cook Book does exactly that; if you live in or are planning to visit the area any time soon that is.

The book sets out to champion local suppliers and make the most of all the food and drink on offer by creating innovative and delicious dishes that all home cooks can try. It certainly does this and more. With so many different types of restaurants, cafes and producers featured, readers are spoilt for choice.

What instantly becomes clear as one of the biggest pluses of the book is the insight readers are given into the backgrounds of the featured locations. From details of their beginnings and growth to what inspires them and drives their passions; it feels very personal and communicates across each individual brand’s image in the simplest and most honest way. It is exactly what the independent and local food industry is all about; feeling more intimate and real, rather than that often-impersonal world of the chain restaurants.

Focus on the backstory

Restaurant highlights within the guide have to be Cheltenham’s The Ox and The White Spoon, as well as Firbosa Hereford, who by the sounds of it supply some exquisite beef. Reading about their interiors, menus, and dedication to the restaurant industry, it is difficult to not want to instantly head out and get stuck in.

The Ox is a place that sounds just perfect for a casual outing with friends; ‘a laid back atmosphere, inventive cocktails and exceptional food,’ whilst The White Spoon, with its short and ever changing menu, portrays the image of being somewhere reserved for special occasions. The real diversity of dining options that are right on peoples doorsteps is simply and quickly communicated throughout the guide.

As if reading about each restaurant wasn’t mouth-watering enough – there’s recipes, featuring some incredibly tasty looking photos. The recipes are a real mixture of classic favourites, some with or without a twist, as well as things most people may not have ever thought of. They certainly make you want to head out and try the real deal.

Taking on the Huxley’s Pork and Peppers with a side of beef dripping chips, inspired by Jesse Smith Butchers we created one tasty meal. Not a bad effort.

Without really realising it, people can become creatures of habit and stick to those places that they know well. The Cotswolds Cook Book offers up a real opportunity to discover more about places that are doing great things with food.

Maybe it isn’t always just about having a quick glance on the internet for what the top rated place to eat is. Perhaps we should all be taking the time to find out more about the places we are eating in and the backstories behind what has come to be.

Have you visited any great restaurants or cafes in the Cotswolds? Let us know.

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Graduate of Media & Journalism with a love of music and entertainment.